Emotionen auf Arbeit

Was haben verrückte Kindheitserinnerungen und Disneyland mit der Karriere zu tun? Und wie kommt man auf die Idee, personifizierte Emotionen zum Mittelpunkt eines Films zu machen? Wir haben anlässlich des Kinostarts von „Alles steht Kopf“ mit Regisseur Pete Docter und Produzent Jonas Rivera gesprochen – und durften dabei tief hinter die Kulissen blicken.

Jonas Rivera und Pete Docter. ©2013 WireImage

„Why are emotions such an important topic – why make an animated movie about it?“

Pete Docter:
„When I pitched it to Jonas, he said: ‚If we do this right, this could be our version of the seven dwarves‘ (laughing). I think, it appealed because of the idea, that we could create really clear and strong characters out of it – and that is, what I think, an animation does really well. So it was basically an opportunity for great and humorous characters, what attracted us.“

Jonas Rivera:
„Yeah, but then, when we started to dig into that topic – attending to your first question, why that is important – we would learn in the research, that there is a reason, why you have every emotion. And just even that idea: An emotion that feels negative, like for example anger, is actually NOT negative. There is a positive reason, why you have anger, and that is to make sure things are fair! Anger is a driver that helps you correct the course things are going. It fascinated us, that there is a positive purpose to that, and led us to the idea, that the emotions would have a job. Each one has a job and therefore a reason for being – and if they had that jobs, they would really work hard to do it good. That just led us back to Pete’s idea, that this could be really funny, because you could have these debates about how to react, and we could show the audience what’s going on in their head – in a kind of fun but truthful way.“

Pete Docter:
„And ultimately, as we got into it, we discovered, that the people you have the deepest connection with are usually people that you’ve had good times with but you’ve also been through sorrow together or have been angry at each other…you’ve gone through this great breadth of emotions. So emotions, I think, are ultimately the key to the most important thing in our lives, which is the relationship we have with each other.“

„How long did it take from the first idea to the final movie?“

Jonas Rivera:
„About five years.“

Pete Docter:
„But most of that was writing, about three years or so. Cracking into the story and figuring out the characters…“

Jonas Rivera:
„Two years then to actually produce it. But in all it took five years of our lives…“

Pete Docter:
„Meep – that’s why we really hope you liked it!“ (laughing)

„What is your favourite childhood memory?“

Jonas Rivera:
„Mine is, when I was three years old and I went to Disneyland for the first time. I remember it vividly! And I think, this – because it was so cool and big and magic – also fueled my career. My love of animation and Disney and all that came from that. I know it is important, because I think about it all the time… Although it was a hundred years ago! (laughs)“

Pete Docter:
„For me, when we were living in Denmark, my sister – I have two younger sisters – had these small rabbits, which in Danish are called ‚kanin‘. And my other sister and I would put on a show for my younger sister, where they (switches his voice) would talk to each other with this weird voice and stuff (laughing). And they would sort of torture each other until my younger sister started to get mad at them because she believed so strongly in that they were doing bad things!“

Jonas Rivera:
„I never heard that story, that’s crazy!“

Pete Docter:
„I kind of feel like that’s what we are doing now. It is like these plays… we are taking these things that are not alive and creating personalities and realities…“

Jonas Rivera:
„And you were good because the audience responded!“ (laughing)

©2015 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.

„Did you have imaginary friends in your childhood?“

Jonas Rivera:
„With me it was more like kind of a Toy Story. I played with my toys as if they were real and talked to them, had meetings with them…“

Pete Docter:
„I used to have a small elephant and he drove a little car that could stick to the wall. This would be perfect, because he could drive around in the framing. So, if I was bored – my parents were big in the classical music and would take me to concerts or something very often – then I draw in the programs and imagined my imaginary friend driving around. I mean, I knew he wasn’t real, I didn’t talk to him.“

Jonas Rivera:
„Did he ever come out of his car? Or did he just cruise around in it?“

Pete Docter:
„Yeah, he would come out of his car, he lived in a little shoe box. His name was Norman.“

Jonas Rivera:
„(laughing) This had nothing to do with Bing Bong in the movie though.“

„Why does Joy have BLUE hair and blue eyes, whereas all the other emotions are the same colour allover?“

Pete Docter:
„We wanted Joy to have more complexity and range, because she is our main character. We thought, it would be good to visualize that as well. We initially had her with orange hair and more of an orange dress, so that all the colours were closer together. But that didn’t quite feel right – and in the end, we like that it is a little bit of a foreshadowing, that her blue hair fits with sadness.“

„So it is kind of a hint to the importance of sadness?“

Jonas Rivera:
„Yes, that’s right, absolutely.“

„Is there a reason, why the emotions in Riley’s head are of mixed gender, whereas the emotions in the other peoples‘ heads are only that persons gender?“

Pete Docter:
„Well, we started with Riley as our main character; I think, all of us have feminine and masculine tendencies. Plus, from an entertainment standpoint, I think it’s just fun to have as much broad spectrum, from different kinds of characters – low voices and high voices, big characters and little characters and also different colours – so we were really just looking for diversity. And then, when you get to Mom and Dad, like in that dinner scene, inside them there’s a lot of layers and things going on. And what we found was, if you went into Moms head and there was a mix of male and female, and then into Dads head with a mix of male and female again… it just got very confusing! So it became much simpler to put mustaches on – for Dad – and the wigs – for Mom. So in this case, we wanted to reduce complexity – simple is good!“

Wir bedanken uns herzlich bei Pete Docter und Jonas Riviera für das spannende Interview mit unserer Redakteurin Verena Bauer und die lustige Zeit in München!

©2015 Disney•Pixar. All Rights Reserved.
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